A CHANGED LAND - a series of colour photographic print-works. (colour archival inkjet print image size w300mm x h240mm) – exhibition size including border w500mm x h500mm.


Fine art prints - Limited edition of 5 per image + 2 AP. Numbered and signed by the artist, including certificate of authentication.


Concentrating on the geographical location of what was Gedling Colliery site Nottingham UK, A Changed Land uses high-resolution digital photography to explore physical environment natural and synthetic.

The initial visit to the colliery site was made simply looking for a place that was near but felt remote from urban sprawl.

I have always been attracted to old industrial sites and all the saturated remains of history. I believe that places have memory.

On the first walk to Gedling Colliery Site Jim and I found a deserted and fenced off location. It was reminiscent of being a kid again. Searching for a hole in the fencing, which wasn’t difficult to find. We felt we’d discovered a sort of secret forgotten place, at least that's how we wanted it to be.


After a few visits we discovered burned out cars, old mining railway carriage wheels, iron rail tracks driven into the ground forming a totem, buried iron bolts and bright red rusted tangled steel cables, displaced concrete blocks and footings drawing in tangled green undergrowth and everywhere a sense of what had been and was no more.


Subsequent visits would reveal a big railway tunnel buried in damp woodland. Across the pit top a network of trench like drainage ditches. Deep in the undergrowth piled railway sleepers rotting with grey clay and impossibly vivid green moss and across the whole site small ponds that would form in rainy weather and then disappear when summer came.

Jim worked differently to me. He quickly spotted things, would make pictures and move on. I would know there was a picture to be made in an area and would wait, or walk from one vantage point to another and back and sometimes not make an image. We would then leave knowing we would return - which we nearly always did.


The dense green woods to the North-west always seemed shady and cool, full of fat old trees carrying dense green cloaks of creeping ivy that formed intricate cross patterns twenty foot and more above the ground. The woods to the West of the site were newer and more dense. On occasion they were too thick to get through even on our hands and knees. Where the new and the old woodlands joined was a ravine dug for the old railway line that disappeared into the ground through a black damp arched tunnel that I never explored but which Jim did. There were two lagoons. The upper one above the pithead was smaller and choked with reeds. The bigger lower one was split in two by an earth bank. Its edges smudged with grey clay that we once tried to short cut though until up to our knees were unable to move and sinking. The woods above the big lagoon were only a few years old. They were small in area but secretive. Once a few yards in you were hidden and yet able to see out. The undergrowth was always bright and a hundred shades of green. The old pithead was divided in two. The big grey concrete bases of long gone buildings still remained and were strewn with crumpled industrial relics. There was a small square grey concrete block house that was occasionally inhabited by a young man who we’d see skulking in the shadows of the doorway before dodging inside. Slightly up from the pithead was an area of hilly grey clay that mimicked the giant slag heap that was there before. It was like a mini mountain landscape complete with peaks and ravines and lakes but it was a lunar landscape barren and sterile. We loved the open yellow straw grassland of the pit top that turned to grey and purple marsh in autumn rains and then froze rock hard glazed in winter frost.


Over the months Jim and I walked the whole site and in all-weather from bleached blinding hot summer days to painful cold blue winter. We continually photographed using both digital and analogue.


Our images are a reaction to and a record of the joining point between the death of industrial coal extraction and the conversion of the landscape to controlled recreation and leisure. What went before was important and shaped not only the landscape but thousands of lives, what follows we don’t really know – more change I guess.


Jim and I feel lucky to have been in the right place at the right time and to have witnessed a short pause in a changing land.

Paul Harrison 2017.

Woodland East slope Glebe Farm Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Ruined concrete footing Pithead Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Ruined buildings Pithead Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Spoil heap #1 Pithead Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Spoil heap #2 Pithead Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Spoil heap #4 Abandoned Blockhouse Pithead Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Spoil heap #6 Pithead Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Spoil heap #7 Pithead Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Reinforced concrete rubble #1 Pithead Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Washout South West slope Scotgrave Farm Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Tracks South West slope Chase Farm Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Drainage conduit South West slope Scotgrave Farm Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Methane extraction plant #1 Pithead Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Woodland South West slope Scotgrave Farm Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Drainage ditch South West slope Chase Farm Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Open Grassland Pit top Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Upper Lagoon East approach Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Upper Lagoon Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Upper Lagoon North West approach Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Tracks #2 Chase Farm South West slope Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Tracks #3 Chase Farm South West slope Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Washout #2 Chase Farm South West slope Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Tree Open Grassland Pit top Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Drainage ditch South West slope Scotgrave Farm Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Drainage ditch #1 Pit top Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Drainage ditch #2 Pit top Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Drainage conduit Upper Lagoon South West approach Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Plantation Upper Lagoon small wood Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Washout #3 West slope Crimea Farm Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Drainage ditch #2 West Flatland Mapperley Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Abandoned railway carriage wheels Flatland Mapperley Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Drainage ditch #1 West Flatland Mapperly Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Tracks Pit top Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Tracks #2 Pit top Gedling Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England

Upper Lagoon North West approach Gedling Colliery Site Nottingham England